#IZM2020 „Who’s that Zinester?“

Seit einigen Jahren beteiligen wir uns am International Zine Month, so auch in diesem Jahr. Die Beiträge bündeln wir unter dem Hashtag #IZM2020. Bisher haben wir als Mitarbeiter*innen hauptsächlich Zines vorgestellt, die uns wichtig sind oder die wir neu in der Sammlung haben. Für dieses Jahr haben wir uns eine neue Rubrik überlegt: „Whos that Zinester?“

Heute ist der letzte Tag des International Zine Month und wir haben noch noch ein Zinester-Feature für euch im Rahmen unserer neu initiierten #IZM-Rubrik „Who’s that Zinester?“

Diesmal geht es um Fußballfankultur. Auch dazu haben wir eine nicht unerhebliche Menge an Fanzines. Jan/LeToMaGiC-Zine hat vor einigen Jahren im Rahmen unseres Forschungsprojektes JuBri- Techniken jugendlicher Bricolage glücklicherweise dazu beigetragen, unsere Sammlung dahingehend zu erweitern.

Der Kontakt wurde nun vor gut einem Jahr lustigerweise via Twitter zwischen Jan und unserer Kollegin Giuseppina, ohne dass es um Zines oder Fußballfankultur ging, wieder aufgenommen. Beide waren ohne Kenntnis voneinander 2019 auf dem großartigen Big Joanie Konzert in Hamburg und haben sich darüber ausgetauscht. Und da lag die Idee nahe, Jan zu bitten, Teil unserer neuen Rubrik „Who’s that Zinester?“ zu werden. Hier nun Jans (LeToMaGic-Zine) Antworten. Viel Spaß!

Tell us about your zine/project!

Letters To Marina Ginesta Coloma is a handcut and handsewn mini artzine about politics, beer, zine libraries and football. It is inspired by Subbuteo, record cover art, Pixi Books and Slinkachu. I visit different places and leave a small, individual painted figure – with an upraised fist to greet Marina Ginesta – on a bottle cap there. The zine itself is a letter to Marina Ginesta i Coloma where I report on these trips. The last but second page always holds a DIY sticker that can be coloured and finished by the readers. I’m always looking forward to receiving stickers from nice spots around the world. If you’re interested in checking it out, you can find it as @LeToMaGiC on Twitter and Issu.

What was the reason to start your own zine? Did someone or something inspire you?

I started to publish a football fanzine for my local non league club around 15 years ago. The first one ran for ten years and was inspired by the ‚Weltbühne‘ magazine from the 1920s. I’ve experimented with a lot of different subjects and sizes since – I’ve published perzines, art zines, a poetry zine, political/historical zines and a photo zine.

What is the first zine you ever fell in love with?

I’m not sure if they would call their publication a zine, but I was fascinated by ‚Der Tödliche Pass‘ very early on. The first zine where I couldn’t wait for the next issue to be published was ‚The Moral Victory‘ by Josie and Louis.

A zine you would recommend because it deals with issues you care about

My favourite zines are those with a political motivation. I like to read zines with a special kind of humour as well as ‚zine zines‘, too. And I love zines that show a special enthusiasm for a thing or person and explore these from new perspectives again and again. That’s why I’m a big fan of ‚Dishwasher Pete‘, the ‚Wes Anderzine‘ or the various zines about Taylor Swift and Patti Smith. Though ‚Butt Springsteen‘ is a good title, too.

Zine related places you visited or want to visit in the future? Tell us why!

I’m always looking for cities, towns and villages where you can find a zine library or collection, a brewery and a local football club. I love to visit these places for my LeToMaGiC zine. I’ve been to Barcelona, London, Altona, Istanbul, Brussels, Manchester, Forlí, Berlin, Athens, Sydney, Melbourne, Vienna, Salzburg, Arnhem, Toronto, Reykjavik, Riga, Bergen, Oslo, York, Plymouth and Falmouth so far. But I’m always up for hints and suggestions!

What projects are you involved in besides publishing zines?

I like any kind of arts and crafts. I was very happy that the wonderful ‚Illustrated Women In History‘ project accepted my first ever silhouette cut-out, for example. I always try to donate any profits of my zines to good causes. So we were the first German football supporters who followed the very important initiative ‚On The Ball‘ (@OnTheBaw) and made period products available at our stadiums for free.

A collaboration you are dreaming about?

One of the best things about the zine community is swapping zines and contributions. I’ve done a few over the last years, but some of the contacts faded away over time as I’m bad at staying in contact with people. I would love to do another zine with Nikos, who I first met at the Athens Zinefest. And I’m always inspired by the work of Nyx from Sea Green Zines.

What would you be more interested in? A zine about cats or dogs?

I have to admit, it should be about Alpacas for me. As there have been football zines like ‚Can I Bring My Dog‘ (Dundee Utd) and ‚Gone To The Dogs‘ (Canterbury) I would go with the dogs here. Perhaps Ruth (@nonleaguedogs) may compile one some day?

A zine about your teen crush would be about?

I would love to say it would have been about Sara Gilbert or Alyssa Milano, but in fact it would have been about Tipp-Kick figures or collecting cards.

Which fellow zinester would you rob a bank with and why?

Mika and Chriz who were brave enough to share a table with me at the Berlin Zinefest in 2014 without ever meeting me in person before. And I’m pretty sure they will get away with the money and donate it to a good cause while I’m getting arrested.

Your life motto or a message you want to share

If the kids are united, they will never be divided.

Danke Jan für deine Antworten, sowie Danke an alle weiteren Zinesters (Evelyn/Vinyldyke-Zine, Nina/SameHeartbeats-Zine, Lilli/Diverse Comics und Fanzines), die mitgemacht haben. Damit verabschieden wir uns aus dem diesjährigen International Zine Month. See you next year.

#IZM2020 „Who’s that Zinester?“

Seit einigen Jahren beteiligen wir uns am International Zine Month, so auch in diesem Jahr. Die Beiträge bündeln wir unter dem Hashtag #IZM2020. Bisher haben wir als Mitarbeiter*innen hauptsächlich Zines vorgestellt, die uns wichtig sind oder die wir neu in der Sammlung haben. Für dieses Jahr haben wir uns eine neue Rubrik überlegt: „Whos that Zinester?“

Wir stellen euch in den kommenden Wochen Zinemacher*innen vor, deren Zines wir toll finden und in der Sammlung haben, mit denen wir arbeiten oder einfach so in einem engen Austausch sind. Wir haben eine kleine Auswahl an Menschen unsere Fragen geschickt und hier sind ihre Antworten.

Heute stellen wir euch die Künstlerin Lilli Loge vor.

Lilli kennen wir schon sehr lange, da sie neben ihrer großartigen Kunst auch in der politischen Vermittlungsarbeit für uns tätig ist. Neben dem Weitergeben von Zeichenskills ist Lilli auch als politische Bildnerin zu queeren und genderrelevanten Themen für unser Projekt Diversity Box aktiv gewesen und leitet auch aktuell npch Comicworkshops für Culture on the Road.

Tell us about your zine/project!

I’m doing  art- and comic-zines – technically since 2003, but more serious since 2008. I like to use zines to try out different things. For example I did several modern queer versions of  “Tijuana Bibles” ( a mixture of satire and sex,  popular in 1920’s – 40’s  USA). I also did a zine about menstrual cups, one about trauma and one about perfectionism.

What was the reason to start your own zine? Did someone or something inspire you?

I could say that I like to experiment with printing and binding-techniques, that I love crafting and that the zine-szene is lovely. I really feel that way, but to be honest, the main reason I started self-publishing was, because I was too shy to take the steps that are needed to get a publisher.

A zine you would recommend because it deals with issues you care about

“These things might help, a self-care-zine” by Lois de Silva.

Zine related places  you visited or want to visit in the future? Tell us why!

I would love to visit all the stores and Distros that sell or sold my zines, that I haven’t visited yet: Microcosm Publishing (Portand), Quimbys Bookstore (Chicago), Disparate (Bordeaux), Fatbottombooks (Barcelona), Taco Che (Tokyo), Boismu (Bejing)

What projects are you involved in besides publishing zines?

I just published the mini-zine  “Aubrey Beardsley on Emotional Violence” with “2Bongoût“.
During the Corona-crisis  I did several  funny instructional comics ( “Motto-days”) on instagram. If we experience a second wave , there might be new “episodes”.
Since 2016 I  am working on a graphic novel which will be published by Avant Verlag. Looks like it might be finished next year..
And I just started a new comic on instagram together with Stef (@underwaterowl).  So, stay tuned!

A collaboration you are dreaming about?

I would like  to work with publishers  from around the world.

What would you be more interested in? A zine about cats or dogs?

I had a cat, so I’m more interested in the weird behaviors of cats.

Which fellow zinester would you rob a bank with and why?

Karla Paloma, because I hope that she would transform into one of the fierce bitches from her zines  when we are in  trouble.

Your life motto or a message you want to share:

All these tacky inspirational quotes spreading over instagram and Facebook are actually  true!







#IZM2020 „Who’s that Zinester?“

Seit einigen Jahren beteiligen wir uns am International Zine Month, so auch in diesem Jahr. Die Beiträge bündeln wir unter dem Hashtag #IZM2020. Bisher haben wir als Mitarbeiter*innen hauptsächlich Zines vorgestellt, die uns wichtig sind oder die wir neu in der Sammlung haben. Für dieses Jahr haben wir uns eine neue Rubrik überlegt: „Whos that Zinester?“

Wir stellen euch in den kommenden Wochen Zinemacher*innen vor, deren Zines wir toll finden und in der Sammlung haben, mit denen wir arbeiten oder einfach so in einem engen Austausch sind. Wir haben eine kleine Auswahl an Menschen unsere Fragen geschickt und hier sind ihre Antworten.

Heute stellen wir euch Evelyn vor. Kennengelernt haben wir Evelyn und ihr Zine Vinyldyke 2019 über Twitter, woraus dann ein IRL Besuch im Archiv folgte und wow, das Zine ist seitdem ganz schön durch die die Decke gegangen. Evelyn scheint da wohl einen Nerv getroffen zu haben. Wir finden es jedenfalls ziemlich super.

Tell us about your zine/ project

I make a zine called ‚Vinyldyke‘. It is an old-school looking music fanzine, all cut and paste with scissors and gluestick, and type-written. I call my writing style diy rock journalism, to move away from classic music journalism, always adding personal comments and stories.

What was the reason to start your own zine? Did someone or something inspire you?

My friend Nina from Gent, Belgium, produces the zine ‚Same Heartbeats‘. She writes about her travels, feminist events and (her own) music, from a very personal perpective. You can find such an enthusiastic attitude and so much encouragement in her zines, you’ll have to make your own zine after reading them. 

What is the first zine you ever fell in love with?

I remember the first zines I came across in the early 2000, punk and riot grrrl zines, had letters so tiny, I wasn’t able to read them. Only a few years ago, I’ve found zines that were using bigger fonts… 

A zine you would recommend because it deals with issues you care about

All issues of ‚Same Heartbeats‘ that I mentioned earlier. You can learn a lot about making zines from those. I recommend doing a lot of zine trades with various people, so you’ll get a lot of new ideas and inspiration.

Evelyn//Vinyldyke//passionless=pointless visiting us at the archive to bring us the newest issue of the zine ❤

Zine related places you visited or want to visit in the future? Tell us why!

I have done so many zine trades with people in so many different countries. A number of small stores in the US and  the UK even sell my zines. One day, when I was preparing a lot of US orders, I decided, why not travel where my zine are going? So I started planning a trip across the USA for summer 2020. It has fallen through now during the pandemic, but I hope I’ll be able visit all those places and fellow zinesters as soon as possible.

What projects are you involved in besides publishing zines?

I play in a Berlin-based grunge band called Passionless Pointless. Jyoti, Kate and I have released our demo tape as a real cassette in March and we’re going to record our first album in August. Playing in a band is very similar to making zines, I think. You’ve got the writing, the creativity, the creative output and the best thing – meeting other people who are into the same kind of stuff. Also, I can write about our music in my fanzine, just the way I like it.

A collaboration you are dreaming about?

More comics, drawings and illustrations, that’s what I’d like for the next issue of Vinyldyke. I’m so bad at drawing, there surely need to be collaborations. 

What would you be more interested in? A zine about cats or dogs?

I once did a zine trade and the mini zine I got was called ‚Do You Have a Male Cat?‘. I’m allergic to both cats and dogs, so it didn’t sound that interesting to me. But it turned out it was a zine about language

learing! if you’re hung over, you have a ‚male cat‘ in German! And if you worked out too hard, you’ll have a ‚muscle cat‘ the next day. I loved it. The zine was written by stolzlippen.

A zine about your teen crush would be about?

I don’t think I had a teen crush. Maybe I’ll do a zine about my teenage role models one day – Axl Rose, Jon Bon Jovi, Kurt Cobain and Nick Cave, just to see if other queer people experienced the same. 

Which fellow zinester would you rob a bank with and why?

There are so many! 

Your life motto or a message you want to share

Passionless=pointless. I love nerdiness in people and seeing how much they’re into what they’re doing. Put your time and energy into what you love and what’s important to you.

#IZM2020//Zine of the day: WEIRDO (2019,First Issue/UK)

During International Zine Month (#IZM2020) we will highlight zines that we like and that show how diverse, political and complex zine and subcultural communities are and always have been.

We start with the WEIRDO Zine from UK. 

The pictures are high quality but even more impressive are the honest interviews adressing many relatable questions about identity and the feeling of not fitting in #culturallimbo

Zine of the Week: Fleisch mit weißer Soße #August2016

Es ist International Zine Month! Zeit für einen Einblick in die Fanzinesammlung des Archivs der Jugendkulturen, in der sich inzwischen mehr als 20.000 Einzelhefte befinden. Heute rezensiert Giuseppina Lettieri aus dem Team Diversity Box.

Das Zine „Fleisch mit weißer Soße“ ist im August 2016 erschienen und eigentlich längst überfällig mal von unserer Seite rezensiert zu werden. Allein der Titel irritiert mich schon seit langem, weil er mehr Rätsel aufgibt als wirklich Hinweise zum Inhalt des Zines- jedenfalls für mich. Nach dem ersten Lesen ist immerhin das etwas klarer. Es geht um Sexarbeit oder besser gesagt um einen persönlichen, wenn auch sehr fragmentarischen Einblick in das Leben einer Person, die im Puff arbeitet.

Und was dann in diesem 14 Seiten dünnen Zine folgt, erinnert ein kleines bisschen an William S. Burroughs „Naked Lunch“ vom Stil, sprachlich jedoch ehrlicherweise eher an Tagebuch-Einträge. Gedanken, scheinbar wahllos aufeinanderfolgend, geben Einblicke in Lebensmomente aus dem August 2016: das konfliktive WG-Leben, unangenehme U-Bahn-Situationen, Migräneanfälle, depressive Phasen und ein erster Hinweis auf den ausgeübten Beruf als Sexworker. Immerhin ist das der längste Text in dem Zine und füllt eine ganze DIN A 6-Seite.

Vom Zine zum Buch

Da das Zine dahingehend nur diesen einen Vorgeschmack zum Thema Sexarbeit zu bieten hat, habe ich auch das gleichnamige Buch von Christian Schmacht, erschienen im Dezember 2017, gelesen. Cut and Paste als künstlerisches Stilmittel durchzieht auch die 105 Seiten des Buches. Auf dem Klappentext wird nun der Kontext geliefert, der dem Zine fehlte. Dort steht:

Christian Schmacht, durch seine Skandalkolumnen für das Missy Magazine bekannt geworden, schreibt in seiner autobiografisch inspierten Novelle über einen jungen transgender Mann, der als Frau verkleidet in den Bordellen Berlins anschafft.

Und sicherlich weiß auch ich durch die Kolumne in der Missy sowie durch die Social Media-Accounts von Christian Schmacht mehr über das Leben als Sexworker, über Körper-und Identitätsfragen, Konsum und das politisches Selbstverständnis des Autors. Mehr als mir manchmal lieb ist sogar, um ehrlich zu sein. In dem Buch beschreibt Christian Schmacht, warum Schreiben und sich der Welt mitteilen eine heilsame Wirkung hat und es nach dem eigenen Selbstverständnis nicht darauf ankommt, ob andere das hören oder lesen wollen:

Schreiben heißt: Ich existiere. Ich schreibe für mich, weil ich will und manchmal weil ich muss; um mich selbst zu erhalten. Oder zu halten. Ich habe mit meinen gedanken eine geschwindigkeit erreicht, mit der andere nur manchmal klarkommen.

Schreiben als Existenz- bzw. Daseinsberechtigung. Denn: Representation matters.

Sexarbeit ist Arbeit oder auch über die Banalität der Sexarbeit im Kapitalismus

Niemand hat sex außerhalb vom kapitalismus, aber darüber wollen viele gern hinwegsehen. bei liebe und sex denken sie, das ist so ursprünglich, das gehört mir, egal wie entfremdet ich sonst bin. Aber das ist nicht wahr und wir sexworker stoßen sie darauf, mit unserer bloßen existenz und das mögen sie nicht.

Das Sexarbeit Arbeit ist, ist in den queerfeminitischen Kontexten, in denen ich mich bewegen, nichts Neues, aber meine Berühungspunkte mit dem Thema waren bisher immer analytischer nicht persönlicher Natur. Ich habe keine Freund*innen, die Sexarbeit machen und beziehe meine Einblicke aus Aktivismus und Popkultur. Die Aktivistin Sylvia Rivera, Transfrau of Color, hat meinen Aktivismus vor einigen Jahren, als ich sie viel zu spät als zentrale Figur der Stonewall-Riots eher per Zufall entdeckte, seitdem stark geprägt. Und mit der Serie Pose stehen zum ersten Mal hauptsächlich BPoC Transfrauen im Mittelpunkt der Geschichte und geben Einblick in das New York der 80er und 90er Jahre, wo Sexarbeit einfach mit zum (Über-) Leben gehörte.

White Privilege

Geht es bei Pose und in den Interviews von Sylvia Rivera im STAR-Zine jedoch eher um die Adressierung struktureller Benachteilungen, wie Rassismus und Trans*feindlichkeit gegenüber BPoC Transfrauen und Queers, die oft einen sozio-ökonomischen Kosmos schufen, der die Sexarbeit bedingte, so anders ist der Einblick den Christian Schmacht als weiße Person in Deutschland aus den Jahren 2016 und 2017 schildert. Christian Schmacht reflektiert die eigenen Privilegien sehr gut und äußerst sich zudem politisch zu Rassismus, Klassismus, Misogynie und der kapitalistischen Verwertungslogik in der Gesellschaft an sich sowie zu Homo-und Transfeindlichkeit und rechter Gesinnung unter den Freiern und auch den Sexarbeiter*innen im Puff. Das blitzt aber immer wieder nur kurz auf. Zu kurz für mein Empfinden. Davon würde ich lieber mehr lesen. Stattdessen sind die Gedankensprünge und die wilde Aneinanderreihung von Themen (von Schernikau zum Dschungelcamp, von der Fashion Week zu Botox bis zum G20-Gipfel in Hamburg) das, was für mich am prägnantesten hängen bleibt. Das soll auch alles gar nicht kohärent sein, glaube ich, sondern Einblicke in die diffuse Gedankenwelt und das Seelenleben einer jungen weißen Trans*person geben, die zwischen Materialismus und Aktivismus schwankt:

Beispiel geld: Lieber wurde ich sexworker, als wenig geld zu haben und für oder gegen etwas zu kämpfen. Ich wollte teilhaben, am leben, mieten, konsumieren.

Fazit

Dieses Review ist eher ein ganz persönlicher Push aus meiner Komfortzone und lässt am Ende auch eher mehr Fragen offen, statt ein klareres Meinungsbild meinerseits erkennen. Die oft kontrovers geführten Debatten zum Thema Sexarbeit in feministischen Diskursen, lösen sich in meinem Kopf ab mit den kurzweilig verfassten Beiträgen von Christian Schmacht. Eines kann ich an dieser Stelle aber abschließend sagen: Nie habe ich vorher so ehrlich und banal über den Beruf Sexarbeiter*in gelesen, über die Langweile im Puff, wenn bei zu gutem oder zu schlechten Wetter die Freier wegbleiben. Davon geht sogar ein bisschen Faszination aus. Da ist die Frage nach dem Titel fast schon wieder vergessen.

Giuseppina Lettieri

Giuseppina schreibt aus einer cis-weiblichen, queerfeministischen, of Color-Perspektive. Sie leitet im Archiv ein queeres Bildungsprojekt und koordiniert seit 2019 den Queer History Month Berlin.

Zine of the Week: Metal Maidens #31

Es ist International Zine Month! Zeit für einen Einblick in die Fanzinesammlung des Archivs der Jugendkulturen, in der sich inzwischen mehr als 20.000 Einzelhefte befinden. Heute rezensiert Lisa Schug aus dem Team PopSub.

Als ich „Metal Maidens“ auf der Suche nach einem ganz anderen Metal Fanzine das erste Mal in den Händen hielt, war ich baff. “Metal Maidens – The Ultimate Magazine Dedicated to Women in Hard Rock & Heavy Metal“, wie konnte mir das als feministisch interessierter Metalfan bisher entgangen sein?

Ob das Metal Maidens Fanzine bei seinem erstmaligen Erscheinen 1995 wirklich “The Only Magazine with a Heart for Female Rockerz” war, wie es auf dem Cover steht, lässt sich heute nicht mehr sagen. Sicher ist aber, dass es eines der wenigen Zeugnisse des Kampfes für mehr Sichtbarkeit von Frauen in der Metalszene im prä-Social-Media-Zeitalter ist. Denn während Initiativen wie #killtheking, #metaltoo oder das Sycamore Netzwerk heute andere Stimmen hörbar machen und in die Szene intervenieren, tat sich in Sachen Sichtbarkeit für marginalisierte Perspektiven im Metal in der Vergangenheit sehr lange sehr wenig.

Im Archiv der Jugendkulturen gibt es bisher nur eine Ausgabe des niederländischen englischsprachigen Fanzines, das von 1995 bis 2005 erschien und online bis heute als Webseite und Facebook-Seite weiterlebt – Nummer 31 aus dem Jahr 2003. Auf 46 Seiten gibt es das klassische Metal-Fanzine-Programm: Interviews, Plattenbesprechungen, Berichte von Konzerten und eine Übersicht über bevorstehende Tourneen – wohlgemerkt nur von Bands mit mindestens einer Musikerin. Was das genau heißt bleibt weit gefasst, teilweise werden auch Bands rezensiert, die „female guest appearences“ auf ihren Platten haben. Auch genremäßig geht es wild durcheinander von Heavy & Death Metal bis hin zur Punkband The Distillers und einem Album von Pop-Sängerin Shania Twain.

Spannend ist der Blick in die Metalgeschichte in der Kategorie „Back to the Past“. Dort werden Protagonistinnen der 80er Jahre Hard-Rock-Bands „Tough Love“ und „Romantic Fever“ interviewt und schildern ihre Erfahrungen:

„The better [bands] were all female. I played in a couple [of bands] where I was the only woman and in these bands, the guys tended to treat me like their little sister and they were very protective.“

Courtney Paige Wolfe in Metal Maidens #31

Einen kleinen Empowerment-Block hat das Fanzine auch: In der Rubrik „Marjo’s Guitar Techniques“ gibt Gitarristin Marjo Marinus praktische Tipps für’s Tapping: Eine Spielart der Gitarre bei der auf die Seiten getippt wird statt sie zu zupfen. Und nicht zuletzt hat Metal Maidens #31 auch eine Beilage: Zum Heraustrennen liegt ein Wandkalender für das Jahr 2003 mit Fotos der Bands Arch Enemy und Sinergy bei.

Soweit so gut. Tatsächlich macht das Fanzine Lust in einige der vorgestellten Bands reinzuhören und selbst weiter zu forschen. Und doch fehlt mir etwas: Was Metal Maidens #31 nicht thematisiert ist sind Erfahrungen von Ausgrenzung und Marginalisierung, die Frauen und Queers in der Metalszene machen. Generell ist die Ausgabe wenig politisch abgesehen von einigen klugen Antworten auf die obligatorische Frage: „Wie ist es in einer all-female Band zu spielen?“.

“ We wanted to change the idea of women in Metal: „Nice dolls in tight clothes with nice voices and at the utmost [sic] playing some bassguitar.“

Nienke von der Band „Autumn“ in Metal Maidens #31

Das Fanzine bietet zwar eine Plattform für Musikerinnen– stellt aber nicht die Frage danach, warum es in erster Linie an Sichtbarkeit mangelt oder es so wenig Metal Musikerinnen gibt. Auch scheint der Fokus der „Metal Maidens“ bis in die heutige Online-Ausgabe hinein ausschließlich auf Cis-Frauen zu liegen, die fehlende Sichtbarkeit für Trans*-, Inter-, nicht-binären Personen in der Metalszene ist kein Thema.

Und dennoch: das Metal Maidens Fanzine hat in über 10 Jahren und 40 Ausgaben ganz sicher dazu beigetragen Metal-Musikerinnen sichtbarer zu machen und das in einer Zeit, in der es im Metal denkbar wenig Unterstützung für solche Ansätze gab. ist Ein wichtiges Relikt der Metal-Geschichte!

Lisa Schug

Zine of the Week: Bullenpest #5

Es ist International Zine Month! Zeit für einen Einblick in die Fanzinesammlung des Archivs der Jugendkulturen, in der sich inzwischen mehr als 20.000 Einzelhefte befinden. Heute rezensiert Almut, Praktikantin im Team PopSub.

Unter dem programmatischen Namen „bullenpest“ erscheint in den 1980er Jahren ein linksautonomes Blättchen in Göttingen. Laut den Macher*innen handelt es sich um ein „ex-gö-punx-blatt“ und eine „zeitung zur billigung von straftaten“. Die anonymen Redakteur*innen „saustall“ und „radikalinski circus“ weisen im Impressum darauf hin, dass die „verkäufer der bullenpest […] mit an sicherheit grenzender wahrscheinlichkeit nicht der redaktion“ angehören.

Die fünfte Ausgabe der bullenpest beginnt mit einem Vorwort, das von den alltäglichen Schwierigkeiten des Zinemachens erzählt. Texte werden nicht oder erst kurz vor Redaktionsschluss eingereicht, beim Schneiden gehen wichtige Teile versehentlich verloren, der Hefter gibt den Geist auf und dann auch noch die Razzia im Jugendzentrum. Das Fazit: „ES HAT MAL WIEDER ALLES NICHT GEKLAPPT“. Optisch folgt das Zine dem Schnipsel-Look, wie wir ihn auch aus Punk-Fanzines kennen: Zeitungsartikel werden mit (ausgedachten) Überschriften, Bildern, Zeichnungen und eigenen Texten oder Kommentaren vermischt. Auffällig ist die extrem kleine Schriftgröße, für die sich die Macher*innen im Heft mehrmals entschuldigen.

Inhaltlich geht es zunächst um „Standardthemen“ der Autonomen. Es gibt Solidaritätsbekundungen mit der ETA, Berichte über Häuserkämpfe, Aktionen gegen das Sachleistungsprinzip für Geflüchtete und Aufrufe zum Umtausch von Wertgutscheinen in Bargeld. Neben einem Verriss des Films „Stammheim“ (mit einem Drehbuch von Stefan Aust) finden sich im Heft auch Bekennerschreiben unter anderem zu einem (Brand-)Anschlag auf das vorführende Kino in Göttingen.

Interessant sind aber vor allem die Artikel, die sich mit den Protesten gegen Atomkraft beschäftigen. Das vermutlich im Herbst 1986 erschienene Heft steht dabei noch im Zeichen der Reaktorkatastrophe von Tschernobyl. Einige Artikel behandeln das breite Protestbündnis vom bürgerlichen bis linksautonomen Spektrum gegen die geplante Wiederaufbereitungsanlage (WAA) in Wackersdorf und die massive Gewalt von Seiten der eingesetzten Polizei. In anderen geht es um das AKW Brokdorf, dass im Oktober 1986 nur wenige Monate nach Tschernobyl in Betrieb genommen wird.

Zusätzlich enthält die Ausgabe einen Erlebnisbericht vom Anti-WAAhnsinns-Festival, das 1986 im bayrischen Burglengenfeld mit bis zu 100.000 Besuchenden stattfindet und auch als deutsches Woodstock Bekanntheit erlangt. Dort positionierten sich renommierte (internationale) Künstler*innen gegen die WAA in Wackersdorf. Der*die anonyme Autor*in übt jedoch scharfe Kritik an der fehlenden politischen Schärfe der dortigen Inhalte und den Abgrenzungsbemühungen vieler Künstler*innen zum militanten Protest und stellt darüber hinaus die Frage nach der Sinnhaftigkeit gewaltfreier Protestformen. Trotz allem trägt dieser Protest in seinen verschiedenen Formen dazu bei, dass der Bau in Wackersdorf drei Jahre später eingestellt wird, die Wiederaufbereitung abgebrannter Brennstäbe aus Kernreaktoren in Deutschland findet nun in Frankreich (La Hague) und Großbritannien (Windscale/Sellafield) statt.

Almut D.

Zine of the Week: Möbiusschleife Vorgestern

Es ist International Zine Month! Zeit für einen Einblick in die Fanzinesammlung des Archivs der Jugendkulturen, in der sich inzwischen mehr als 20.000 Einzelhefte befinden. Heute rezensiert Lisa Schug aus dem Team PopSub.

„Dieses Zine, gemacht von der ATO, die nicht mehr existent ist, da auch das T aus ATO nicht mehr existiert, heißt Möbisusschlaufe [sic], weil es (das Zine) mit Zeit und ihrer Vergangenheit zu tun hat.“ Alles klar? Was von außen anmutet wie ein klassisches Punkfanzine – Illustration, Collage, Xerox-Kopie – ist ein kleines Schmankerl aus der Science-Fiction-Sammlung des Archivs der Jugendkulturen: „Möbiusschlaufe Vorgestern“.

Das nur 18-seitige Zine aus Denzlingen (in der Nähe von Freiburg im Breisgau) wurde von einer Gruppa namens ATO 1993/94 erstellt und redaktionell von Kurt Snietka betreut (der heute offenbar in Denzlingen expressionistische Ausstellungen macht). Es enthält zwei Kurzgeschichten und eine zynische Abrechnung mit dem Gerfandom, also der deutschsprachigen Science-Fiction-Fanszene und ist wegen seiner Auseinandersetzung mit Zeit, Logik und Zukunft auch dieser zuzurechnen.

Highlight ist eine Art absurd-experimentelles Frage-Antwort-Spiel mit dem Titel „Möbiusschleife vorgestern – Sanduntergänge“, in dem eine imaginäre Person in einer Prüfungssituation Fragen wie „Woraus besteht ein Schurwollepullover?“ beantwortet. Richtige Antwort, laut Möbiusschleife vorgestern: Aus Seegras. „[…] die Grenze zwischen tierischer (Schafswolle) und pflanzlicher (Seegras) Herkunft wurde als eine bloß mit dem zeitlichen Entwicklungsstand zugehörige erkannt. Es ist in der Tat eine Frage der zeitlichen Entwicklung, ob es sich um höher- oder niedrig entwickelte Organismen handelt, also eine Frage des zeitlichen Quantums. Quantitative Kriterien sind aber qualitativen Kriterien untergeordet – deshalb ist die Frage korrekt beantwortet.“

Ob die VHS-Version des Zines, die auf der letzten Seite beworben wird, tatsächlich jemals angefordert wurde, kann an dieser Stelle leider nicht beantwortet werden. Allerdings war „das Zine auf den Aufnahmen [auch] nicht lesbar, gezeigt werden die Seiten vor der Heftung als ein Bild.“

Im Rahmen unseres aktuellen Bibliotheks- und Archivprojektes „Pop- und Subkulturarchiv International“ können wir uns endlich intensiver mit unserer etwa 3.000 Hefte umfassenden Science-Fiction Sammlung beschäftigen und finden hoffentlich noch viel mehr solcher herrlich-skurriler Hefte.

Lisa Schug